“It ain’t over till it’s over.” | 100/100

Here we are – 100 days in a row, complete. Seeing it all laid out in one place is pretty wild. I’m so glad I embarked on this challenge.

It’s been incredibly tricky to get it done, and I’ve learned some valuable lessons along the way:

  • Discipline = freedom. You cannot rely on extrinsic motivation (E.G. people cheering you on – what happens on the day they stop? You stop too).
  • Curiosity is key. Writing every day leaves you with a relentless hunger for more knowledge, more information, more data to process and draw connections between. Developing a kind of inherent curiosity in my everyday life has been key (E.G. listening to different types of music, persevering with difficult or unusual books).
  • You have no excuse. I’ve written on ferries, on planes, in the back of taxis and sat on a suitcase at the airport. If you refuse to accept no for an answer, you’ll find the time.

Thank you so much to everyone who’s followed along. I hope you’ve gleamed something valuable from at least a few posts.

Here are the previous 99 – I’d love to know which struck a chord and which fell a bit flat:

  1. Why you should self-audit ruthlessly. | 1/100
  2. You have to give yourself a purpose. | 2/100
  3. Why less is more: the economics of moderation. | 3/100
  4. Sleep machismo and the danger of blind spots. | 4/100
  5. Back from the brink. | 5/100
  6. Laying the first brick. | 6/100
  7. Logging off. | 7/100
  8. The quality of quantity: a lesson on the creative process from Stephen King | 8/100
  9. Accepting the unchangeable. | 9/100
  10. New isn’t always better. | 10/100
  11. Hang a different picture. | 11/100
  12. Should we use jealousy as fuel? | 12/100
  13. The past shows us how we should talk about politics. | 13/100
  14. There’s no cap on creativity. | 14/100
  15. Teddy Roosevelt and the meaning of life. | 15/100
  16. Steinbeck, creative destruction and future-proofing. | 16/100
  17. Two ways to get ‘unstuck’. | 17/100
  18. Hunter S. Thompson on the power of constrained creativity. | 18/100
  19. Why self-reliance is more important than ever in 2018. | 19/100
  20. The importance of zooming out. | 20/100
  21. We can all dance to our own tune. | 21/100
  22. Why we need comedians. | 22/100
  23. Learning through osmosis? | 23/100
  24. Let yourself be moved. | 24/100
  25. We want to see the nuts and bolts. | 25/100
  26. Stand your ladder against a different wall. | 26/100
  27. Reanimating ‘dead time’. | 27/100
  28. “A beautiful point.” | 28/100
  29. The restorative power of music. | 29/100
  30. The joker and the thief. | 30/100
  31. “When you’re bad, you stink.”| 31/100
  32. Laugh at your problems. | 32/100
  33. Stand up today. | 33/100
  34. Getting robotic. | 34/100
  35. You’re not as smart as you think you are. | 35/100
  36. Face your fears – or nothing will change. | 36/100
  37. All the way. | 37/100
  38. “Start me up, I’ll never stop.” | 38/100
  39. Interviewing the world. | 39/100
  40. An ancient operating system. | 40/100
  41. Get going. Don’t stop. | 41/100
  42. The exorcism of excuses. | 42/100
  43. Ask yourself: when has getting angry ever solved anything? | 43/100
  44. 4 things that should be taught in every school. | 44/100
  45. Making stuff needn’t be so tricky. | 45/100
  46. Lazy, selfish, jealous, bitter – and good?| 46/100
  47. Kindness, with ‘No Reservations’. | 47/100
  48. Instagram for inspiration and education: my top 3 accounts. | 48/100
  49. A paradigm shift in the creative process: work when you can’t create. | 49/100
  50. Steer clear of dementors. | 50/100
  51. One step forward, two steps back: what Hegel and Marcus Aurelius can teach you about how to progress.| 51/100
  52. Becoming your own editor. | 52/100
  53. Create hard times for yourself – so you can thrive. | 53/100
  54. Simple pleasures. | 54/100
  55. Snatching victory from the jaws of defeat. | 55/100
  56. Leveraging Parkinson’s Law for massive productivity gains. | 56/100
  57. Connecting the dots. | 57/100
  58. The ‘sandwich on the mountain’ epiphany. | 58/100
  59. The triumph of the banana king. | 59/100
  60. How do you know when to stop paying attention? | 60/100
  61. Now. | 61/100
  62. I’m sorry. | 62/100
  63. Sensory illusions. | 63/100
  64. The fortress under the mountain and preventing cognitive distortions. | 64/100
  65. Following the crowd. | 65/100
  66. Under pressure. | 66/100
  67. An incomparable gift. | 67/100
  68. The most valuable currency. | 68/100
  69. The four buckets of creativity (or ‘how to never run out of ideas’). | 69/100
  70. It’s easy to criticise from the sidelines. | 70/100
  71. Flattened by trivialities. | 71/100
  72. The power of being assertive. | 72/100
  73. Lagom. | 73/100
  74. Evolutionary grit: adapt and thrive. | 74/100
  75. How to become enlightened. | 75/100
  76. Creative wisdom from Dave Chappelle: “The idea takes you where it wants to go.” | 76/100
  77. The 50th Law: book recommendation. | 77/100
  78. The Duke of Wellington on preparing for life’s challenges. | 78/100
  79. Mapping my creative genealogy: Seth Godin on the unstoppable forces of change. | 79/100
  80. Hemingway’s timeless wisdom on reading. | 80/100
  81. Vonnegut on criticism. | 81/100
  82. Fiction: an untapped well of wisdom. | 82/100
  83. How we can all learn to live with a lifetime of small failures. | 83/100
  84. Is it good enough? | 84/100
  85. A short guide on how to find good books. | 85/100
  86. An exhaustive holiday reading list. | 86/100
  87. James Dyson on pride – and progress. | 87/100
  88. And how do we eat the elephant? | 88/100
  89. A taste for oratory. | 89/100
  90. Ideas (alone) mean nothing. | 90/100
  91. Open your ears: 5 podcasts to inspire, entertain and educate. | 91/100
  92. Shit happens. So what next? | 92/100
  93. Won’t versus can’t. | 93/100
  94. Realists are the real innovators. | 94/100
  95. No script, no cast, no shark: a recipe for success? | 95/100
  96. Tabula rasa. | 96/100
  97. What goes into your creative soup? | 97/100
  98. Stop looking for the easy way. | 98/100
  99. The power to choose. | 99/100

I’d highly recommend undertaking a similar challenge, whatever your field; consistent daily practice at any sort of craft is immensely meaningful and rewarding.

9 Comments

    1. Thanks so much for the comment Barry – and for following along! You’ve been a constant presence and I truly appreciate it. You certainly will – perhaps not daily, but at least once a week.

      Like

    1. Hi Jeremy – thanks for stopping by. I’ve just started a new job, so certainly been less busy. Aiming to kick it off again in the new year. Appreciate all your thoughtful comments!

      Like

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